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Food Unwrapped

Did you watchFood Unwrapped on Channel 4 recently?

If you want to find out some truly astonishing facts about the health benefits of Micro Greens you can catch the episode online now!

http://www.channel4.com/programmes/food-unwrapped/on-demand/65676-020

The Microgreens we grow here at Nurtured in Norfolk are the first sprouts of seeds, which are harvested 7-14 days after germination and before the full growth of the first pair of leaves of the plant. Their length can reach 10cm.

Studies have found that at this point microgreens are at their peak in terms of the content of vitamins and minerals.

 

Another study compared three types of broccoli micro cress to mature broccoli. It was found that content of minerals in microgreens is higher. They contain much more phosphorus, potassium, magnesium, manganese, iron, zinc, sodium and copper1.

Another study showed similar results in spinach microgreens compared to adult spinach2.

The variety of antioxidants was revealed that it’s concentration in broccoli micro cress was 10 times higher than in the adult plant3. The sharper the leaf, the more bitter it is, the higher the content of antioxidants4. The more we consume microgreens with the stronger taste, the more antioxidants that are important for our health receives the body.

 

Nutritional values:

Vitamin K1 is necessary for blood clotting in the human body. The study found that microgreens of amaranth, sorrel, purple basil, coriander, celery, radish, kohl rabi and peasare richer in vitamin K1 even more than adult spinach and broccoli5. It was also found that the concentration of vitamin K1 in broccoli microgreens is at least 3 times higher than its concentration in the mature plant, and the concentration of this vitamin in basil microgreens is 7 times higher than its concentration at the stage of plant ripening.

 

Vitamin C plays an essential role in the production of collagen protein responsible for the stability of bones, tendons, ligaments and cartilage. Recommended daily intake of vitamin C is 90mg / day for men and 75mg / day for women.

  • 100g of purple cabbage microgreens contains almost 150mg of vitamin C.
  • 100g of amaranth microgreens – 130mg, 3 times higher than in an adult plant.
  • 100g of radish microgreens or purple basil microgreens – 90mg.

Microgreens of mustard, green basil, daikon, kohl rabi and sorrel also provide a significant amount of vitamin C6.

 

Beta-carotene is necessary to protect the body against oxidants. The recommended daily intake is 6mg per day. The test found that all examined microgreens contain 90-200% of the recommended daily dose of beta-carotene per 100g of the product. Particularly coriander and purple cabbage. All the microgreens here at Nurtured in Norfolk grow in the light. Microgreens of wasabi, purple basil, tendril peas and amaranth have the same concentrations of beta-carotene as mature carrots and sweet potatoes7. The concentration of lutein/zeaxanthin in microgreens of coriander is 11 time higher than their concentration in mature leaves, and the concentration of violaxanthin is 5 times higher.

 

Vitamin E plays an important role in preventing the oxidant of cell membranes and low-density lipoproteins in the blood. The recommended daily intake for adults is 15mg.  The microgreens of daikon contain more than 5 times the recommended daily dose per 100g.

Microgreens of coriander, beets, peas, radish are also an excellent source of vitamin E. Rocket, celery, amaranth, basil, mustard, purple cabbage, sorrel and wasabi will provide 100% more of the recommended daily allowance per 100g. Research data reveal that purple cabbage microgreens contain 40 times more vitamin E than mature purple cabbage.


1 Weber, C. F. (2017). Broccoli microgreens: A mineral-rich crop that can diversify food systems. Frontiers in Nutrition , 4 

2 Mir, S. A., Shah, M. A., & Mir, M. M. (2017). Microgreens: Production, shelf life, and bioactive components. Critical reviews in food science and nutrition , 57 (12), 2730-2736.

3 Nakagawa, K., Umeda, T., Higuchi, O., Tsuzuki, T., Suzuki, T., & Miyazawa, T. (2006). Evaporative light-scattering analysis of sulforaphane in broccoli samples: Quality of broccoli products regarding sulforaphane contents. Journal of agricultural and food chemistry , 54 (7), 2479-2483

4 Xiao, Z., Lester, G. E., Park, E., Saftner, R. A., Luo, Y., & Wang, Q. (2015). Evaluation and correlation of sensory attributes and chemical compositions of emerging fresh produce: Microgreens. Postharvest Biology and Technology , 110 , 140-148

5 Xiao, Z., Lester, G. E., Luo, Y., & Wang, Q. (2012). Assessment of vitamin and carotenoid concentrations of emerging food products: edible microgreens. Journal of agricultural and food.chemistry , 60 (31), 7644-7651

6 Xiao, Z., Lester, G. E., Luo, Y., & Wang, Q. (2012). Assessment of vitamin and carotenoid concentrations of emerging food products: edible microgreens. Journal of agricultural and food .chemistry , 60 (31), 7644-7651

7 Xiao, Z., Lester, G. E., Luo, Y., & Wang, Q. (2012). Assessment of vitamin and carotenoid concentrations of emerging food products: edible microgreens. Journal of agricultural and food .chemistry , 60 (31), 7644-7651

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